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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

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Vice President Joe Biden wasn’t the only one sitting on the fence when it came to making certain decisions about the 2016 Democratic presidential race.

Some prominent Black Democratic leaders were apparently waiting for President Barack Obama‘s longtime political compatriot to make the decision whether to run before endorsing a candidate this election season.

Now that Biden has decided not to enter the race, leaders are flocking to front-runner Hillary Clinton. To be sure, an endorsement from top elected officials during primary elections usually signifies who will be the Democratic and Republican presidential nominee.

On Friday, the campaign kicked off African Americans for Hillary in Atlanta, Ga., which was organized by Jesse Jackson Sr.’s Rainbow PUSH and slated to be attended by Georgia U.S. Rep. John Lewis, Georgia House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams, and Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed. She has also garnered endorsements from U.S. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries of New York, U.S. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey, and U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver of Missouri.

Clinton is also scheduled to roll out her criminal justice agenda at the event, which will include calling for an end to racial profiling and fairer sentencing for crack cocaine use, an aide told NewsOne.

“Clinton believes we must rebuild the bonds of trust between our communities and our police, end the era of mass incarceration, and ensure a pathway from prison to home,” the aide said about her criminal justice agenda.

Indeed, criminal justice is an important issue in communities of color, and Clinton’s campaign enjoys the support of mayors from 87 cities around the country, including more than 50 African-American mayors.

“When Hillary Clinton becomes President, Philadelphians will wake up every day knowing they have someone who will fight for their priorities in the White House,” Mayor Michael Nutter, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, said in a statement. “I’m proud to support Hillary Clinton’s candidacy, and will be working through Election Day to support her agenda that will help Philadelphians get ahead and stay ahead.”

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has held off endorsing Clinton since April, on Friday presented her with a ringing endorsement.

“I’m proud to endorse Hillary Clinton for President.  For decades, she’s been a powerful force for progressive change – from her work as a young lawyer at the Children’s Defense Fund, to taking on the big insurance companies as First Lady, to being a champion in the U.S. Senate for families struggling to get by,” de Blasio said in a statement. “Before she entered this race, we knew that she’d be one of the most experienced and capable people ever to run for the office.  The bold vision for tackling income inequality that she’s outlined in this campaign – from Universal Pre-K, to paid sick and family leave, to closing tax loopholes that benefit the rich and powerful — is exactly what our country needs now.  She’ll be the most progressive Democratic nominee in my adult life, and she’ll be a President who fights each day to rebuild our middle class.”

Clinton, the astute politician who sharpened her skills by working with her husband, former President Bill Clinton, wasted no time touting the endorsements–no matter the timing. She was likely well aware that Biden was poised to seize the Clinton Black Card, which was bestowed on her by her husband.

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GOP Presidential Candidate Ben Carson Campaigns In Colorado Day After Party's Third Debate

Ben Carson Draws Fire Over “Relationship” With Nutritional Supplement Co.

Republican 2016 presidential second runner-up Ben Carson is under fire for denying at this week’s debate that he didn’t have a relationship with a controversial health-supplement company, while his record shows differently.

During the debate in Boulder, Colorado, CNBC moderator Carl Quintanilla asked Carson, a retired pediatric neurosurgeon, about his relationship with Mannatech after it was forced to pay “$7 million to settle a deceptive-marketing lawsuit in Texas,” according to The Atlantic:

“Well, it’s easy to answer,” Carson quickly replied. “I didn’t have an involvement with them. That is total propaganda and this is what happens in our society. Total propaganda.” He then backtracked a little. “I did a couple of speeches for them. I did speeches for other people, they were paid speeches,” he told the crowd before switching back to a full denial. “It is absolutely absurd to say that I had any kind of relationship with them.” Then he again acknowledged a role. “Do I take the product? Yes, I think it’s a good product.”…

As the Wall Street Journal reported earlier this month, Carson’s relationship with the company deepened over time, including “four paid speeches at Mannatech gatherings, most recently one in 2013 for which he was paid $42,000, according to the company.” The company disputes that Carson was a “paid endorser or spokesperson,” according to the Journal, and claims his financial compensation went to charity.

National Review also highlighted Carson’s connections to Mannatech in January and how Carson’s team went to great lengths to distance themselves from the company. Some of his video appearances have been removed from the Internet, but those that remain appear to show a deeper affiliation than Carson claimed during Wednesday’s debate.

Carson spokesman Armstrong Williams told CNN that the candidate is being unfairly targeted. What with all the exaggerations being bandied about this election season, Carson should borrow a page from Republican front-runner Donald Trump, who brags about things that are hard to prove – like how he is going to be great with the military as president – rather than something that can be easily proved – like hawking supplements at recorded speaking engagements.

SOURCE: The Atlantic | PHOTO CREDIT: Getty | VIDEO CREDIT: Inform

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